Tax cuts for the rich; pay cuts for the poor — March 18, 2012

Tax cuts for the rich; pay cuts for the poor

Same old Tories, ey? Well, only if you believe the spin that the Left are pedalling.

The 2012 Budget has caused a lot of debate already, and its not officially announced until Wednesday. But lets have a look at two policies that almost seem certain to be included in George Osborne’s budget.

Cutting the 50p tax rate

There has been a lot of speculation over the past month that Osborne is set to cut the 50p tax band. His reasoning for this is that en masse people have avoided paying the tax. To clarify, tax avoidance is legal. Now you can complain that those avoiding tax are morally bankrupt and avoiding paying their dues to society until the cows come home, but regardless, its still going to happen. The tax rate was introduced by the last Labour Government as a temporary measure to raise extra revenue for the state. And yet, it is rumoured that this isn’t the case. Rumours are that the Treasury is losing out on £500m a month due to tax avoidance. By lowering the tax rate, the Government hopes to recoup more tax, which can then be used to redistributed to those most in need. £6bn a year is a hell of a lot of money! Even if these rumours turn out to be unfounded, if it turns out the 50p tax rate is losing even a penny in revenue for the Treasury it should be cut. To keep the 50p tax band would be a shambolic symbol that we in Britain are against success, we envy the rich and we oppose wealth creation. So yes, it is a tax cut for the rich, but when the dust has settled it will be society who has benefited.

Ending National Pay Bargaining

On Saturday it was announced that the Government would end National Pay Bargaining. The Public Sector in the UK is a sacred cow, much like the NHS. Any reform is met with staunch criticism. Six million people are employed by the state, a figure that in itself is incredible. In some areas in the UK public sector workers are paid 18% more than their private sector counterparts. Inequalities between the two sectors causes tensions between people. The details of the policy are still very sketchy, but localised pay should be praised, not blindly opposed. Public sector workers in the South East need to be paid more than their counterparts in the North East, it is common sense. The costs of living between the two regions are diametrically different, so it makes sense that their pay should be separated.

So there we go, don’t believe the torrid nonsense about the same old nasty Tories, put your brain into gear and see what the policies are really about!

Sunday Trading Laws — March 13, 2012

Sunday Trading Laws

Vince Cable was caught out last week for having attacked the Coalition for lacking a growth plan. Vince has obviously forgotten that a) He’s part of the Coalition b) His department should be encouraging growth.

So I’ve thought of an idea for him. Scrap the Sunday Trading Laws! This a policy that won’t sit well with the “natural conservative” or religious types. But, frankly, I don’t really care. I understand their views, but I don’t believe in a world where the private sphere of Religion should be influencing the public realm of politics. So that’s one complaint dealt with quickly.

The weekend, the great bastion of freedom from the boring, slavish week of work, right? What do people do? They drink, they see friends and family and they shop. But bizarrely, they have to do the most of their shopping on Saturday’s, because we have state enforced opening and closing times on Sunday’s here in the UK.

Before 1994, the people of the UK couldn’t shop at all on Sundays. Now we’ve had “great progress” and we can shop for 6 hours, normally between 10am-4pm.

Surely I cannot be the only person to think that this is just ridiculous. If we scrap the bill, then people can fully enjoy their weekends and shop like they do any other day of the week. Sunday isn’t special to the large majority of people in the UK. It’s just another day, it should be their choice when to shop.

 

We must stick to Plan A — January 25, 2012

We must stick to Plan A

History never repeats itself, but it does rhyme.

Rising debt, a Conservative led government tackling a global economic crisis, an incompetent policy devoid Opposition and a war of words with Argentina. Yes you’d be hard led to believe we weren’t back in the 1980s.

Today’s growth figures are a mixed bag. A contraction of 0.2% in the final quarter is of course bad news. Manufacturing continues on a worrying declining trend and future growth forecasts are being revised downwards daily. To compound the misery the national debt yesterday reached £1 trillion, a highly symbolic figure.

But its not all gloom and doom. There are signs that Plan A is working. The overall growth for 2011 was 0.9%. The rate of borrowing fell and is ahead of target. And let’s not forget our interest rates on the international markets remain incredibly low, showing that the markets still have confidence in George Osborne’s plan.

Yes the cuts are beginning to bite, and yes the medicine is a bitter pill to swallow, but like any ill patient we must continue to nurse them back to full health.